Drug Rehab Really Does Work If It’s Done Right

With all the media coverage about actors “returning” for more drug rehab, a number of them for your third or fourth period, a lot of people are getting the notion that rehab does not actually do the job. Some people have started to think that people financing for Austin rehab centers is a waste of tax dollars. The truth is that lifelong recovery from alcohol and drug addiction is practically a certainty when drug rehab is completed right.


The public’s lack of confidence in austin rehab centers is contributing to dangerously poor ideas, like putting people hooked on alcohol or drugs on another drug, or worse, legalizing drugs. These aren’t solutions they’re problems masquerading as alternatives. The call for legalization of drugs is the most persuasive proof that drug rehab is basically a hit-or-miss collapse in most, or even most, configurations. This is complete surrender, a complete capitulation to the power of drugs. It states, “Alright, drugs. You win. Come on in and rule our own lives since there’s nothing we could do about you.”
Placing heroin addicts on methadone is just another testament to the collapse of the majority of approaches to rehab. Methadone “replacement therapy” is entrenched across the nation and around the globe. Addicts stay hooked on some “legal” drug instead of an illegal one. The thought of getting free of drugs has just been abandoned. The thought process that contributes to the non-solution is, “Drug rehab likely will not get the job done, and it is going to be a lot of trouble to attempt and save this individual anyway. They won’t discuss contaminated needles and they may get a few of their own life back. Of course, they are hooked on the drug now, but what exactly can we do about it?”
Another illustration of “replacement therapy” is placing drug addicts, and particularly alcoholics, on addiction-blocking drugs like naltrexone. This drug prevents the brain receptors out of reacting to opiate drugs and alcohol, and really works for some time to decrease the craving for the chemical. Sounds good, right? The problem is naltrexone blocks all enjoyment answers. Life only turns grey and is not really worth living. And worse, it may increase the chance of an opiate overdose, which is deadly.